Frederator Times

While you are putting the final touches on your schedule for San Diego Comic-Con (SDCC), you’d be all kinds of crazy to miss the Cartoon Hangover: Bee and PuppyCat and Friends panel slated for Thursday, July 24, 5:30-6:30p! The panel will feature Natasha Allegri, creator of Cartoon Hangover's Bee and PuppyCat, which is the most successful crowdfunded animated series ever, as well as the cast and crew, including Ally Rachel (voice of Bee), Kent Osborne (voice of Deckard), Efrain Farias (art director), Becky Dreistadt (character designer), Frank Gibson (writer & voice of Wallace), Madeleine Flores (writer), Hans Tseng (designer), and moderated by Frederator VP/Development, Eric Homan. Wait - there’s Much More! The Cartoon Hangover: Bee and PuppyCat and Friends panel will also showcase Cartoon Hangover’s new short Manly, which premieres next week, and a discussion with its creators Jesse Moynihan and Justin Moynihan. But that’s not all folks! The voice of Bravest Warriors’ Catbug, Sam Lavagnino, will be signing autographs Friday, July 25 at 10a and again at 1p at Viz Media’s Booth (#2813 on the main show floor). An episode of Cartoon Hangover’s  Bravest Warriors, directed by Breehn Burns, creator of Dr. Tran and director of Bravest Warriors, will be one of 35 films screened as part of the Sick & Twisted Gauntlet of Animation live voting festival on Friday, July 25 at 9:30p (room 6BCF). Breehn Burns will also sign autographs at the Spike and Mike booth (#1536) on Saturday, July 26, 2-3:30p. Check the SDCC schedule for updated information, including signings for Natasha Allegri. Have fun everyone - and do’t forget to tell us what/who you saw and what you got! Thanks,  Gwen

July 22, 2014

While you are putting the final touches on your schedule for San Diego Comic-Con (SDCC), you’d be all kinds of crazy to miss the Cartoon Hangover: Bee and PuppyCat and Friends panel slated for Thursday, July 24, 5:30-6:30p! The panel will feature Natasha Allegri, creator of Cartoon Hangover's Bee and PuppyCat, which is the most successful crowdfunded animated series ever, as well as the cast and crew, including Ally Rachel (voice of Bee), Kent Osborne (voice of Deckard), Efrain Farias (art director), Becky Dreistadt (character designer), Frank Gibson (writer & voice of Wallace), Madeleine Flores (writer), Hans Tseng (designer), and moderated by Frederator VP/Development, Eric Homan.

Wait - there’s Much More!

The Cartoon Hangover: Bee and PuppyCat and Friends panel will also showcase Cartoon Hangover’s new short Manly, which premieres next week, and a discussion with its creators Jesse Moynihan and Justin Moynihan.

But that’s not all folks!

The voice of Bravest Warriors Catbug, Sam Lavagnino, will be signing autographs Friday, July 25 at 10a and again at 1p at Viz Media’s Booth (#2813 on the main show floor).

An episode of Cartoon Hangover’s  Bravest Warriors, directed by Breehn Burns, creator of Dr. Tran and director of Bravest Warriors, will be one of 35 films screened as part of the Sick & Twisted Gauntlet of Animation live voting festival on Friday, July 25 at 9:30p (room 6BCF).

Breehn Burns will also sign autographs at the Spike and Mike booth (#1536) on Saturday, July 26, 2-3:30p.

Check the SDCC schedule for updated information, including signings for Natasha Allegri.

Have fun everyone - and do’t forget to tell us what/who you saw and what you got!

Thanks, 

Gwen

Who doesn’t like a burly man with a chainsaw!?! Well, Ramses and his spirit pal, Tiny Ghost, the stars of Cartoon Hangover’s new Too Cool! Cartoons short “Chainsaw Richard,” sure do. Created/written by Christopher Reineman, Chainsaw Richard debuted on Thursday, July 17, 2014 and follows young Ramses and Tiny Ghost on their adventure to sneak into the premiere of a super scary movie. “Chainsaw Richard” was directed/storyboard by Tom King, and features the voices of Tyler Merna (Ramses), Ashly Burch (Tiny Ghost and Female Voice), Eric Bauza (Chainsaw Richard, Theater Guy and Officer), and River Jordan (EMT). Check out the full list of the talented cast/crew. Born in Key West, Florida and currently living near Stockholm, Sweden, Reineman is a self-taught artist who has been interested in animation “for as long as I can remember.” As a kid, Reineman says he spent lots of time writing down his own ideas for episodes of his favorite cartoons. Reineman is also known for his popular webcomic Feel Afraid. Fans can find his other comics, illustrations, and sketches at his Tumblr or and follow him on Twitter. Is Tiny Ghost a boy or a girl? What would the title of the show be if it went to series? For answers to those burning questions and more … read this fab interview with Christopher Reineman right here (and see a sketch of him just below too). Did you draw a lot growing up? Sort of, when I was in elementary school. I remember I used to draw these little comics for the girl I sat next to in science class, probably trying to win her over. Other than that I would just draw little animals or fish until my interest in drawing sort of petered out at some point. I didn’t really start drawing until I was 18. What was your favorite doodle to draw? I liked drawing stick figures with facial expressions, I thought it was great you could make yourself laugh with just how an expression looks. How did you learn to draw? Did you go to art school? Nope, all self-taught. I took an art class in high school at some point, but everything I’ve learned art-related has been from sleepless nights reading tutorials on the internet and experimenting with Photoshop. When did you create your popular web comic, Feel Afraid? How did Feel Afraid inform Chainsaw Richard? I started making Feel Afraid probably in late 2009, I was probably around 18. That comic has a lot to do with Chainsaw Richard, but also doesn’t. Tiny Ghost is a character from it, which I basically transplanted, though I’ve changed their personality a bit to better play off Ramses’ character. I guess you could say the horror elements and “oh no it got even worse” humor are signature for Feel Afraid, but really they’re just what make sense to me. How did you and Chainsaw Richard make your way to Frederator’s Cartoon Hangover? We got found! I got a really out of the blue e-mail from Frederator’s Eric Homan asking if I’d like to pitch an idea for a cartoon, apparently he’d read some of my comics. I’m actually pretty sure he found my stuff when Natasha Allegri reblogged a comic of mine on Tumblr. Was Chainsaw Richard initially a comic before being pitched as an animated short - where did the idea come from? Chainsaw Richard wasn’t, but the characters for Ramses and Tiny Ghost were in some comics. They basically started out as this sort of thing I would daydream about. I had just moved to a new city to start university, and the few friends I had there were either sort of jerks or just distant, so I was pretty lonely. To keep myself occupied, I got involved in the local punk house show scene. A lot of the people there were sort of unfriendly too, and that’s when I started just getting this idea of how much more tolerable it would be if my little ghost character just showed up and was really independent and cool and always wanted to do fun stuff. So I made a few comics based on that, just us doing stuff, like making Tiny Ghost buy me beer down at the gas station or digging for food in a dumpster, just this sort of fictional, really rough and gross street life with only my little ghost bud by my side. Ramses basically took the place of myself, the rest stayed the same. So, is Ramses really you overall? The looks are a bit shaped after a little kid version of me. I’m definitely a way calmer person than Ramses though. The title of your short is Chainsaw Richard, which is the title of the movie that Ramses and Tiny Ghost sneak into. If the short went to series, what do you think you’d title the series? I’ve thought of a lot of different names, but “Ghost Town” is the only one that ever sticks. I think I’d call it that if I didn’t come up with anything better. Chainsaw Richard, Feel Afraid and some of your other work is dark in nature - what is it about scary stories or dark content that is so intriguing to you? I always loved those Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark books and horror shows on tv. I wouldn’t say I’m a huge horror genre fan or anything like that, I think I mostly just love the amount of emotion that comes with horror, and the amount of back story you can fit into it. When you see markings on the walls in Chainsaw Richard, it seems really forbidding, but it also adds a sort of implied history. You can put so much story into why someone is evil or a house is haunted. What sorts of things scare you? Not a lot of traditional stuff scares me, mostly just things like if a character is deranged. Like, the strange neighbor is leading you to the basement to show you something, and the moment you notice they’ve put a fishing line across the steps halfway. That stuff is truly scary to me. Is Tiny Ghost based on other ghost characters in comics or animation? In which of your projects did Tiny Ghost first appear? Tiny Ghost is kind of a response to ghost characters, if anything. I just sort of wanted to make this overly cute little ghost who was really nervous about haunting, and obviously would rather not have to haunt things at all. Tiny Ghost first appeared in Feel Afraid as a ghost making its first haunting. That comic’s probably my most popular one actually. Does Tiny Ghost have a gender? To me, Tiny Ghost is naturally genderless. I thought when I was pitching the cartoon that I’d have to decide on one, but then again I didn’t see why I had to if I’m not comfortable with it. Maybe “ghost” can be a gender? Ramses reminds me of Scott Pilgrim - are you a Scott Pilgrim fan? I’ve never read those comics actually, though I mean to. Is it the eyes? It’s the eyes, isn’t it. I just wanted Ramses to have this permanently really intense look on his face and I needed those big ol’ eyes. What has been your favorite part of bringing Chainsaw Richard to animated life? Probably trying to find places to build atmosphere and add to the world it takes place in. Also I’d say working with a lot of really nice and talented people. Prior to Chainsaw Richard had you ever worked with anyone on the production team — like director Tom King? How did you meet? I had not, this was a lot of firsts for me. Tom King was introduced to me as a potential storyboard artist and director, and after seeing his history in animation I was glad to have him on-board the project. What were your favorite comics and cartoons growing up? What are your favorites now? As far as comics, I was really only into the funny ones, or comedy books that had lots of little illustrations in them. For cartoons, I remember I really liked the Rugrats and Hey Arnold, and also really into SpongeBob. I have so many favorites right now though, I really believe we’re currently living in a golden age for animation. So many people are bringing a lot of passion into the animation scene, and I’m glad I get to be a part of it in some way. Thanks Chris. If you like this, take a look at the other recent Too Cool! Cartoon Dead End and read the Frederator Times interview with Dead End Creator Hamish Steele. - Gwen

July 19, 2014

Who doesn’t like a burly man with a chainsaw!?! Well, Ramses and his spirit pal, Tiny Ghost, the stars of Cartoon Hangover’s new Too Cool! Cartoons short Chainsaw Richard, sure do. Created/written by Christopher Reineman, Chainsaw Richard debuted on Thursday, July 17, 2014 and follows young Ramses and Tiny Ghost on their adventure to sneak into the premiere of a super scary movie. “Chainsaw Richard” was directed/storyboard by Tom King, and features the voices of Tyler Merna (Ramses), Ashly Burch (Tiny Ghost and Female Voice), Eric Bauza (Chainsaw Richard, Theater Guy and Officer), and River Jordan (EMT). Check out the full list of the talented cast/crew. Born in Key West, Florida and currently living near Stockholm, Sweden, Reineman is a self-taught artist who has been interested in animation “for as long as I can remember.” As a kid, Reineman says he spent lots of time writing down his own ideas for episodes of his favorite cartoons. Reineman is also known for his popular webcomic Feel Afraid. Fans can find his other comics, illustrations, and sketches at his Tumblr or and follow him on Twitter. Is Tiny Ghost a boy or a girl? What would the title of the show be if it went to series? For answers to those burning questions and more … read this fab interview with Christopher Reineman right here (and see a sketch of him just below too).

Did you draw a lot growing up?

Sort of, when I was in elementary school. I remember I used to draw these little comics for the girl I sat next to in science class, probably trying to win her over. Other than that I would just draw little animals or fish until my interest in drawing sort of petered out at some point. I didn’t really start drawing until I was 18.

What was your favorite doodle to draw?

I liked drawing stick figures with facial expressions, I thought it was great you could make yourself laugh with just how an expression looks.

How did you learn to draw? Did you go to art school?

Nope, all self-taught. I took an art class in high school at some point, but everything I’ve learned art-related has been from sleepless nights reading tutorials on the internet and experimenting with Photoshop.

Sketch of Chris

When did you create your popular web comic, Feel Afraid? How did Feel Afraid inform Chainsaw Richard?

I started making Feel Afraid probably in late 2009, I was probably around 18. That comic has a lot to do with Chainsaw Richard, but also doesn’t. Tiny Ghost is a character from it, which I basically transplanted, though I’ve changed their personality a bit to better play off Ramses’ character. I guess you could say the horror elements and “oh no it got even worse” humor are signature for Feel Afraid, but really they’re just what make sense to me.

How did you and Chainsaw Richard make your way to Frederator’s Cartoon Hangover?

We got found! I got a really out of the blue e-mail from Frederator’s Eric Homan asking if I’d like to pitch an idea for a cartoon, apparently he’d read some of my comics. I’m actually pretty sure he found my stuff when Natasha Allegri reblogged a comic of mine on Tumblr.

Was Chainsaw Richard initially a comic before being pitched as an animated short - where did the idea come from?

Chainsaw Richard wasn’t, but the characters for Ramses and Tiny Ghost were in some comics. They basically started out as this sort of thing I would daydream about. I had just moved to a new city to start university, and the few friends I had there were either sort of jerks or just distant, so I was pretty lonely. To keep myself occupied, I got involved in the local punk house show scene. A lot of the people there were sort of unfriendly too, and that’s when I started just getting this idea of how much more tolerable it would be if my little ghost character just showed up and was really independent and cool and always wanted to do fun stuff. So I made a few comics based on that, just us doing stuff, like making Tiny Ghost buy me beer down at the gas station or digging for food in a dumpster, just this sort of fictional, really rough and gross street life with only my little ghost bud by my side. Ramses basically took the place of myself, the rest stayed the same.

So, is Ramses really you overall?

The looks are a bit shaped after a little kid version of me. I’m definitely a way calmer person than Ramses though.

The title of your short is Chainsaw Richard, which is the title of the movie that Ramses and Tiny Ghost sneak into. If the short went to series, what do you think you’d title the series?

I’ve thought of a lot of different names, but “Ghost Town” is the only one that ever sticks. I think I’d call it that if I didn’t come up with anything better.

Chainsaw Richard, Feel Afraid and some of your other work is dark in nature - what is it about scary stories or dark content that is so intriguing to you?

I always loved those Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark books and horror shows on tv. I wouldn’t say I’m a huge horror genre fan or anything like that, I think I mostly just love the amount of emotion that comes with horror, and the amount of back story you can fit into it. When you see markings on the walls in Chainsaw Richard, it seems really forbidding, but it also adds a sort of implied history. You can put so much story into why someone is evil or a house is haunted.

What sorts of things scare you?

Not a lot of traditional stuff scares me, mostly just things like if a character is deranged. Like, the strange neighbor is leading you to the basement to show you something, and the moment you notice they’ve put a fishing line across the steps halfway. That stuff is truly scary to me.

Is Tiny Ghost based on other ghost characters in comics or animation? In which of your projects did Tiny Ghost first appear?

Tiny Ghost is kind of a response to ghost characters, if anything. I just sort of wanted to make this overly cute little ghost who was really nervous about haunting, and obviously would rather not have to haunt things at all. Tiny Ghost first appeared in Feel Afraid as a ghost making its first haunting. That comic’s probably my most popular one actually.

Does Tiny Ghost have a gender?

To me, Tiny Ghost is naturally genderless. I thought when I was pitching the cartoon that I’d have to decide on one, but then again I didn’t see why I had to if I’m not comfortable with it. Maybe “ghost” can be a gender?

Ramses reminds me of Scott Pilgrim - are you a Scott Pilgrim fan?

I’ve never read those comics actually, though I mean to. Is it the eyes? It’s the eyes, isn’t it. I just wanted Ramses to have this permanently really intense look on his face and I needed those big ol’ eyes.

What has been your favorite part of bringing Chainsaw Richard to animated life?

Probably trying to find places to build atmosphere and add to the world it takes place in. Also I’d say working with a lot of really nice and talented people.

Prior to Chainsaw Richard had you ever worked with anyone on the production team — like director Tom King? How did you meet?

I had not, this was a lot of firsts for me. Tom King was introduced to me as a potential storyboard artist and director, and after seeing his history in animation I was glad to have him on-board the project.

What were your favorite comics and cartoons growing up? What are your favorites now?

As far as comics, I was really only into the funny ones, or comedy books that had lots of little illustrations in them. For cartoons, I remember I really liked the Rugrats and Hey Arnold, and also really into SpongeBob. I have so many favorites right now though, I really believe we’re currently living in a golden age for animation. So many people are bringing a lot of passion into the animation scene, and I’m glad I get to be a part of it in some way.

Thanks Chris.

If you like this, take a look at the other recent Too Cool! Cartoon Dead End and read the Frederator Times interview with Dead End Creator Hamish Steele.

- Gwen

By now you have watched Dead End, Cartoon Hangover’s newest Too Cool! Cartoons,  at least 10 times. If not — what’s taking you so long? Created by animator Hamish Steele, Dead End premiered on Cartoon Hangover on Thursday, June 26, 2014, and features the voices of Zack Pearlman (Barney), Cameron Goodman (Norma), Stefan Marks (Pugsley and God of the Internet), and Maria Bamford (Pauline). Hamish lives in London and graduated from Kingston University in 2013. He has worked on projects for the BBC, Frederator Studios, BOOM! Studios, Random House, and Nickelodeon, as well as his own projects. Luckily for us the “God of the Internet” was on our side when Hamish took some time to answer some of our questions. How did you connect with Frederator Studios for your new animated short Dead End for Cartoon Hangover? I first became aware of Cartoon Hangover through a call for submissions that was going around Tumblr. I was still at university and I only answered the call as an exercise for myself to try and come up with a cartoon idea. I never thought my short would be chosen because I thought Cartoon Hangover wouldn’t be interested in people with no previous experience in the industry or even people who weren’t from the US. But they were incredibly welcoming and patient and seemed to love my stuff. Where did the idea for Dead End come from? I originally didn’t pitch Dead End, instead I showed them a few pages from a comic I was working on at the time called Killing Time. It starred Barney and Norma but was about a time-traveling fighting tournament. Cartoon Hangover said they loved the characters but that the story wouldn’t work, so I put them into a new setting, along with a dog character I’d been drawing called Pugsley and it just ended up being ghost related. Classic horror cinema is something I love. The feel of the short is inspired by a 70s Japanese horror movie called Hausu and there are a few tiny references to it in the short. In addition to creating Dead End, what other roles did you perform on the short? I seemed to do a bit of everything. I helped direct the voice actors, I storyboarded the short, I designed stuff and ended up animating a lot of it. I was a jack of all trades. But the animation work from director/layout artist, Mel Roach, animators Leanne Lee and Dale Anderson, and background painter Andrew Onorato was incredible. My job while animating was mostly to color in and polish off their amazing work. How did you meet Mel Roach? I didn’t physically meet Mel until after production as I live in London, UK and she lives in Melbourne, Australia. But, Mel’s Rocket Dog was my favorite Cartoon Hangover short and part of the reason I pitched Dead End to them, so it was a dream come true having her work on the short! So, you didn’t know Mel Roach before? How did you get put together for Dead End? I think possibly because I had no experience, Cartoon Hangover wanted to put me with someone who’d been through what I had been through and asked if I’d like to work with Mel. Where was Dead End animated and produced? It was so interesting - I was working it from London, it was being animated mostly in Melbourne and then it was being produced by Frederator’s Cartoon Hangover in the US. Is it hard/weird working on a show with you in London, Mel in Australia, and Frederator’s Cartoon Hangover in the US? Strangely it seemed to work fine and since then I’ve done animation productions solely based in the UK and I’ve not noticed a significant difference. We all shared a Dropbox and were emailing each other every day so it just felt like normal to me! It was sometimes hard not having face to face contact with the animators but we were still in constant communication. Do you have a favorite moment of Dead End that just worked out even better than you could have imagined? I have a lot of favorite moments in the short, but, my favorite moment of working on it was getting the first bits of animation back from the guys in Australia. There was Norma! Talking, moving! This character who had been in my head for years was suddenly alive and I got a bit more emotional than I expected! The scene that was animated was the bit when Norma is lying on the ground, sulking about not having any internet. So that moment always makes me happy. How did you decide which characters would be American voices and which would be British? I’d always imagined them all as American. Surprisingly, it was the  producers at Cartoon Hangover who wanted to make Pugsley British. I think the Cartoon Hangover team had found my initial delivery of the lines when reading through the storyboard funny. “It might explain the wallpaper” they just thought sounded funniest in a British accent (I’ve never really understood why!). But in the end in it gives Pugsley a unique charm - dogs don’t speak so it’s no stranger that he speaks with a British accent then if he didn’t. I’ve said this a lot to the team but Barney’s voice is so spot on it almost weirds me out. The entire cast are amazing but Zack Pearlman as Barney sounds exactly like the voice in my head when I was doing that initial comic. Are any of the characters based on you or people you know? There’s a little bit of me in all the main characters. Norma’s a bit addicted to her blog, Barney’s a bit self-conscious of his rear end and feels the need to prove his masculinity all the time and Pugsley backwards rolls out of windows when he’s scared - just like me! If viewers pay close attention they will see some interesting things in the backgrounds — like swords, skulls, axes, spears, and a heart in a jar, to mention a few. There are also the social media comments fly by too. Were those all your ideas? Most of the in jokes and background references were background painter Andrew Onorato’s doing. He was in charge of the backgrounds but luckily we have a similar sense of humor and a few shared interests so there are references to some of our favorite comedy shows such as Tim & Eric and Look Around You. However, I wrote out all the tweets and YouTube comments you see flying past the camera in those scenes. They’re all unique so be sure to pause the short and go through them all. I thought it’d be fun to make a few little in-jokes about Cartoon Hangover - I was delighted that they got what I was doing and didn’t think I was making fun of them. Those are some of the more obvious ones - are there other hidden things that fans should look out for - or maybe some private jokes you can share? There are a couple of references to Mel’s Rocket Dog in the short (neither of which she actually requested!) There’s also a passing reference to a certain Bravest Warriors character. Perhaps the most obscure reference is for a cult BBC mockumentary from the 90s called Ghostwatch . Ghostwatch is probably my favorite horror film/TV show of all time and I reference it in my stuff all the time but nobody ever seems to notice because there are only a handful of people who know what it is - and my reference is so “blink and you’ll miss it” that even people who have seen it might not catch it. Maybe in the future I’ll do a comprehensive list of all the references in Dead End! What are some of your favorite cartoons? There are so many… Ren and Stimpy was a big influence on me growing up - I don’t think any show has made me laugh as much as some episodes of that. I also adored The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack - I love cartoons which feel textured and grimy. Aardman’s Rex the Runt is probably my favorite British cartoon and Dead End’s sort of deadpan sense of humor is definitely inspired by that show (three people who have seen the short have asked me if I’m a fan of Rex!) I’m obviously a big fan of Adventure Time. I’m also really enjoying Steven Universe and Clarence. Clarence especially appeals to me because of its almost realistic and downbeat tone. Even though Dead End is full of ghosts and magic, I always like to capture that realistic edge. What else are you or have you recently been working on? Well, Leanne, Dale and Andrew worked with me again on an upcoming short for Nickelodeon called Badly Drawn Animals. It’s set in a zoo that’s facing a mutiny. After that, I have my first graphic novel coming out - Pantheon! It’s a humorous take on the Egyptian myths but its still completely faithful. I’m hoping that leads to me doing a lot more comics in the future. I’d love to do a Dead End comic, taking a sort of Tales from the Crypt / Goosebumps formula. Thanks Hamish! - Gwen

June 28, 2014

By now you have watched Dead End, Cartoon Hangover’s newest Too Cool! Cartoons,  at least 10 times. If not — what’s taking you so long? Created by animator Hamish Steele, Dead End premiered on Cartoon Hangover on Thursday, June 26, 2014, and features the voices of Zack Pearlman (Barney), Cameron Goodman (Norma), Stefan Marks (Pugsley and God of the Internet), and Maria Bamford (Pauline). Hamish lives in London and graduated from Kingston University in 2013. He has worked on projects for the BBC, Frederator Studios, BOOM! Studios, Random House, and Nickelodeon, as well as his own projects. Luckily for us the “God of the Internet” was on our side when Hamish took some time to answer some of our questions.

How did you connect with Frederator Studios for your new animated short Dead End for Cartoon Hangover?

I first became aware of Cartoon Hangover through a call for submissions that was going around Tumblr. I was still at university and I only answered the call as an exercise for myself to try and come up with a cartoon idea. I never thought my short would be chosen because I thought Cartoon Hangover wouldn’t be interested in people with no previous experience in the industry or even people who weren’t from the US. But they were incredibly welcoming and patient and seemed to love my stuff.

Where did the idea for Dead End come from?

I originally didn’t pitch Dead End, instead I showed them a few pages from a comic I was working on at the time called Killing Time. It starred Barney and Norma but was about a time-traveling fighting tournament. Cartoon Hangover said they loved the characters but that the story wouldn’t work, so I put them into a new setting, along with a dog character I’d been drawing called Pugsley and it just ended up being ghost related. Classic horror cinema is something I love. The feel of the short is inspired by a 70s Japanese horror movie called Hausu and there are a few tiny references to it in the short.

In addition to creating Dead End, what other roles did you perform on the short?

I seemed to do a bit of everything. I helped direct the voice actors, I storyboarded the short, I designed stuff and ended up animating a lot of it. I was a jack of all trades. But the animation work from director/layout artist, Mel Roach, animators Leanne Lee and Dale Anderson, and background painter Andrew Onorato was incredible. My job while animating was mostly to color in and polish off their amazing work.

How did you meet Mel Roach?

I didn’t physically meet Mel until after production as I live in London, UK and she lives in Melbourne, Australia. But, Mel’s Rocket Dog was my favorite Cartoon Hangover short and part of the reason I pitched Dead End to them, so it was a dream come true having her work on the short!

So, you didn’t know Mel Roach before? How did you get put together for Dead End?

I think possibly because I had no experience, Cartoon Hangover wanted to put me with someone who’d been through what I had been through and asked if I’d like to work with Mel.

Where was Dead End animated and produced?

It was so interesting - I was working it from London, it was being animated mostly in Melbourne and then it was being produced by Frederator’s Cartoon Hangover in the US.

Is it hard/weird working on a show with you in London, Mel in Australia, and Frederator’s Cartoon Hangover in the US?

Strangely it seemed to work fine and since then I’ve done animation productions solely based in the UK and I’ve not noticed a significant difference. We all shared a Dropbox and were emailing each other every day so it just felt like normal to me! It was sometimes hard not having face to face contact with the animators but we were still in constant communication.

Do you have a favorite moment of Dead End that just worked out even better than you could have imagined?

I have a lot of favorite moments in the short, but, my favorite moment of working on it was getting the first bits of animation back from the guys in Australia. There was Norma! Talking, moving! This character who had been in my head for years was suddenly alive and I got a bit more emotional than I expected! The scene that was animated was the bit when Norma is lying on the ground, sulking about not having any internet. So that moment always makes me happy.

How did you decide which characters would be American voices and which would be British?

I’d always imagined them all as American. Surprisingly, it was the  producers at Cartoon Hangover who wanted to make Pugsley British. I think the Cartoon Hangover team had found my initial delivery of the lines when reading through the storyboard funny. “It might explain the wallpaper” they just thought sounded funniest in a British accent (I’ve never really understood why!). But in the end in it gives Pugsley a unique charm - dogs don’t speak so it’s no stranger that he speaks with a British accent then if he didn’t.

I’ve said this a lot to the team but Barney’s voice is so spot on it almost weirds me out. The entire cast are amazing but Zack Pearlman as Barney sounds exactly like the voice in my head when I was doing that initial comic.

Are any of the characters based on you or people you know?

There’s a little bit of me in all the main characters. Norma’s a bit addicted to her blog, Barney’s a bit self-conscious of his rear end and feels the need to prove his masculinity all the time and Pugsley backwards rolls out of windows when he’s scared - just like me!

If viewers pay close attention they will see some interesting things in the backgrounds — like swords, skulls, axes, spears, and a heart in a jar, to mention a few. There are also the social media comments fly by too. Were those all your ideas?

Most of the in jokes and background references were background painter Andrew Onorato’s doing. He was in charge of the backgrounds but luckily we have a similar sense of humor and a few shared interests so there are references to some of our favorite comedy shows such as Tim & Eric and Look Around You. However, I wrote out all the tweets and YouTube comments you see flying past the camera in those scenes. They’re all unique so be sure to pause the short and go through them all. I thought it’d be fun to make a few little in-jokes about Cartoon Hangover - I was delighted that they got what I was doing and didn’t think I was making fun of them.

Those are some of the more obvious ones - are there other hidden things that fans should look out for - or maybe some private jokes you can share?

There are a couple of references to Mel’s Rocket Dog in the short (neither of which she actually requested!) There’s also a passing reference to a certain Bravest Warriors character. Perhaps the most obscure reference is for a cult BBC mockumentary from the 90s called Ghostwatch . Ghostwatch is probably my favorite horror film/TV show of all time and I reference it in my stuff all the time but nobody ever seems to notice because there are only a handful of people who know what it is - and my reference is so “blink and you’ll miss it” that even people who have seen it might not catch it. Maybe in the future I’ll do a comprehensive list of all the references in Dead End!

What are some of your favorite cartoons?

There are so many… Ren and Stimpy was a big influence on me growing up - I don’t think any show has made me laugh as much as some episodes of that. I also adored The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack - I love cartoons which feel textured and grimy. Aardman’s Rex the Runt is probably my favorite British cartoon and Dead End’s sort of deadpan sense of humor is definitely inspired by that show (three people who have seen the short have asked me if I’m a fan of Rex!)

I’m obviously a big fan of Adventure Time. I’m also really enjoying Steven Universe and Clarence. Clarence especially appeals to me because of its almost realistic and downbeat tone. Even though Dead End is full of ghosts and magic, I always like to capture that realistic edge.

What else are you or have you recently been working on?

Well, Leanne, Dale and Andrew worked with me again on an upcoming short for Nickelodeon called Badly Drawn Animals. It’s set in a zoo that’s facing a mutiny. After that, I have my first graphic novel coming out - Pantheon! It’s a humorous take on the Egyptian myths but its still completely faithful. I’m hoping that leads to me doing a lot more comics in the future. I’d love to do a Dead End comic, taking a sort of Tales from the Crypt / Goosebumps formula.

Thanks Hamish!

- Gwen

New creators are always joining Channel Frederator Network - and each month we showcase some of their cool content. Help us welcome our new Channel Frederator Network creators on board, including David Firth (Salad Fingers) and check out their work in the May 2014 New Members Trailer. In case you missed them - here are the New Creator Trailers for: April 2014; March 2014; February 2014 - Gwen

June 26, 2014

New creators are always joining Channel Frederator Network - and each month we showcase some of their cool content.

Help us welcome our new Channel Frederator Network creators on board, including David Firth (Salad Fingers) and check out their work in the May 2014 New Members Trailer.

In case you missed them - here are the New Creator Trailers for: April 2014March 2014February 2014

- Gwen

There’s more to developing a successful YouTube channel than just creating and posting content. Where are you going to find the info you need to attract and maintain gobs of devoted subscribers for your YouTube channel? Glad you asked. The Top 10 YouTube Commandments, a new free eBook by Matt Gielen, Director of Programming & Audience Development at Frederator Network, that’s where! Here’s why you should heed the sage advice Matt imparts in The 10 YouTube Commandments - Matt studied many successful YouTube channels and the practices that helped them develop a loyal audience, and he also led the Frederator team that drove its Cartoon Hangover channel to 1+ million subscribers in just over one year. In case you are wondering … that is a lot of subs for one year. Published by Frederator Books and distributed by Vook, Inc., The 10 YouTube Commandments is also available via Amazon and Barnes and Noble for various devices including for Mac and iOS devices (iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch), Kindle Fire (except 1st generation), Kindle Fire HD, and Nook. Check out our three part interview with Matt (parts one, two, and three). Also check out Matt’s column in Tubfilter. *Book cover art by Miri Park - Gwen

June 23, 2014

There’s more to developing a successful YouTube channel than just creating and posting content. Where are you going to find the info you need to attract and maintain gobs of devoted subscribers for your YouTube channel? Glad you asked. The Top 10 YouTube Commandments, a new free eBook by Matt Gielen, Director of Programming & Audience Development at Frederator Network, that’s where!
Here’s why you should heed the sage advice Matt imparts in The 10 YouTube Commandments - Matt studied many successful YouTube channels and the practices that helped them develop a loyal audience, and he also led the Frederator team that drove its Cartoon Hangover channel to 1+ million subscribers in just over one year. In case you are wondering … that is a lot of subs for one year.
Published by Frederator Books and distributed by Vook, Inc., The 10 YouTube Commandments is also available via Amazon and Barnes and Noble for various devices including for Mac and iOS devices (iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch), Kindle Fire (except 1st generation), Kindle Fire HD, and Nook.

Check out our three part interview with Matt (parts one, two, and three). Also check out Matt’s column in Tubfilter.

*Book cover art by Miri Park
- Gwen

There’s more to developing a successful YouTube channel than just creating and posting content. Where are you going to find the info you need to attract and maintain gobs of devoted subscribers for your YouTube channel? Glad you asked. The Top 10 YouTube Commandments, a new free eBook by Matt Gielen, Director of Programming & Audience Development at Frederator Network, that’s where!

Here’s why you should heed the sage advice Matt imparts in The 10 YouTube Commandments - Matt studied many successful YouTube channels and the practices that helped them develop a loyal audience, and he also led the Frederator team that drove its Cartoon Hangover channel to 1+ million subscribers in just over one year. In case you are wondering … that is a lot of subs for one year.

Published by Frederator Books and distributed by Vook, Inc., The 10 YouTube Commandments is also available via Amazon and Barnes and Noble for various devices including for Mac and iOS devices (iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch), Kindle Fire (except 1st generation), Kindle Fire HD, and Nook.

Check out our three part interview with Matt (parts one, two, and three). Also check out Matt’s column in Tubfilter.

*Book cover art by Miri Park

- Gwen

frederatortimes: In programming your YouTube channel, what does it take to attract viewers to your YouTube channel and keep them coming back? Programming strategies is the focus of part three of our discussion with Matt Gielen, Director of Programming and Audience Development for Cartoon Hangover (1.3 million subscribers, 100+ million views) and Channel Frederator Network (400+ partner channels, 7.5+ million subscribers, and 1 billion+ views).  FT: What programming strategies really work in getting viewers to watch content on a YouTube channel? Matt: I would say there are three really important factors in getting people to watch your videos on YouTube, which is obviously an important component in programming. First and foremost is absolutely the ‘thumbnail’. I like to say that your thumbnail is the equivalent to when a movie studio releases its movie. In order to drive people into the theater – what a movie studio does is buy billboards, they buy ads all over YouTube and the internet, they do these crazy interactive display things, they buy billboards on the side of buses, they run trailers before other movies, they get their stars to appear on late night [and other] talk shows and do interviews with bloggers, and buy paid advertorials, buy print ads in magazines, I could keep going, right? YouTubers have their thumbnails and their titles. That is the entirety of what gets put in front of most of their potential viewers. (Editor’s Note: If you don’t create your own thumbnail, YouTube generates it for you – and it may not best represent your content.) But, for the most part the thumbnail is going to be the thing that is the ultimate deciding factor in whether someone chooses to click on your video or not. Those are hands-down the most important things - the thumbnail and the title - that the YouTuber, with limited time and resources, can put their effort into in terms of getting someone to watch their content. There are three principals that we stress in regards to thumbnails and titles. And they are: 1 - They should accurately describe your content. That doesn’t necessarily mean that it has to have a title that literally spells out exactly what happens in it – but – it shouldn’t be misleading. 2 - The thumbnail and title should excite the viewer. It should get them interested in watching your content. It should be appealing and it should be eye-catching. Those two are similar – but they are also different. What catches the eye versus what gets someone excited about what’s in the video can be two very different things. 3 - The third thing is the programming of the channel. In the sense of, are you laying the groundwork with your uploads, with your best practices, to have a viewer be excited about your next video that is coming out. That takes into account things like, ‘next time on’ trailers, and in the end card of your video telling people that you’re going to be uploading a new video and get them excited about it. The viewers are only going to be as excited about your content as you are. So, making sure you are communicating your schedule effectively. Making sure you have the right information in your description. Also, making sure you’re active on social media – and telling people on those outlets where they can watch your videos. What are some of the other basic programming strategies that you find creators may not be aware of to nurture their channel? Certain basics are – regular and consistent uploads. It’s not only good for the YouTube algorithm; it’s good for your audience, which wants a regular amount of fresh content. It is similar to a blog - if you don’t put anything up for a while, people are going to forget about you. If you go to a blog and you see they haven’t posted anything in a month, two months, you have no reason to come back on a regular basis to see if there’s anything new, or to get their latest updates. We’ve also had a tremendous amount of success in paid media – advertising – as a programming strategy. We’ve generated probably around 15-20 million views and half a million subscribers from our paid media. That’s been extremely powerful. Are you talking about advertising solely on other YouTube channels or advertising elsewhere? Solely on other YouTube channels. We’ll use 100% TrueView in display or In-Search. What about a situation where you don’t have something new to put up on your channel for a long time? What do you do to keep people psyched and interested and coming back even though you don’t have exactly what they want – when they want it? In regards to how do you keep the audience entertained when you don’t have the primary content … here’s an example: On Cartoon Hangover we introduced, very early on, the show Hungover With Cade, which is basically the human face to our Cartoon Hangover channel. That allows us to make content much quicker than how long it takes to make an animated video, which takes anywhere from 9 - 18 months to make a single animated short or episode. So, Hungover with Cade kind of functions as a bit of a blog for the channel. So Cade gives updates on where we are on production and new products that are coming out and that sort of thing. We also have our shorts program, Too Cool Cartoons, which are a series of short animated films. Those are all really really popular. This is the programming effort that created Bee & PuppyCat, which is now being produced as a new series. It’s kind of a combination of ingenuity and finding other content that will still be very appealing to the audience that is similar in tone and style. How do you support the channel creators in the Channel Frederator Network community – not just with their deal – but with promotion and support of their content? The goal for Channel Frederator Network is to be cartoon central on the internet. So, it’s really the best of both worlds – Channel Frederator needs cartoons to be cartoon central on the internet and our network partners need audience for their content. So, by sharing their content with the audience on Channel Frederator, we’re exposing the Channel Frederator audience to these awesome creators and their channels as well as having programming for Channel Frederator. Additionally, every week we showcase our creators within our weekly shows “ToonsDay!”, which features creator content every Tuesday, and “Saturday Morning Cartoons”, which debuts a group of new cartoons from our creators every Saturday morning. Both of these programming outlets are designed to spotlight videos from the Channel Frederator Network of animators and entertainers. How do you reach viewers that may be watching content similar to Cartoon Hangover or Channel Frederator content elsewhere? Remarketing, which is advertising to people who have already viewed or subscribed to one of our YouTube channels. We do a tremendous amount of remarketing for Cartoon Hangover; we don’t do as much for Channel Frederator. For Cartoon Hangover, remarketing is one of our biggest drivers for the paid-media campaign. Check out the first and second parts of our interview with Matt, also check out Matt’s column in Tubfilter.   - Gwen

June 23, 2014

frederatortimes:

In programming your YouTube channel, what does it take to attract viewers to your YouTube channel and keep them coming back? Programming strategies is the focus of part three of our discussion with Matt Gielen, Director of Programming and Audience Development for Cartoon Hangover (1.3 million subscribers, 100+ million views) and Channel Frederator Network (400+ partner channels, 7.5+ million subscribers, and 1 billion+ views). 
FT: What programming strategies really work in getting viewers to watch content on a YouTube channel?
Matt: I would say there are three really important factors in getting people to watch your videos on YouTube, which is obviously an important component in programming.
First and foremost is absolutely the ‘thumbnail’. I like to say that your thumbnail is the equivalent to when a movie studio releases its movie. In order to drive people into the theater – what a movie studio does is buy billboards, they buy ads all over YouTube and the internet, they do these crazy interactive display things, they buy billboards on the side of buses, they run trailers before other movies, they get their stars to appear on late night [and other] talk shows and do interviews with bloggers, and buy paid advertorials, buy print ads in magazines, I could keep going, right? YouTubers have their thumbnails and their titles. That is the entirety of what gets put in front of most of their potential viewers.
(Editor’s Note: If you don’t create your own thumbnail, YouTube generates it for you – and it may not best represent your content.)
But, for the most part the thumbnail is going to be the thing that is the ultimate deciding factor in whether someone chooses to click on your video or not.
Those are hands-down the most important things - the thumbnail and the title - that the YouTuber, with limited time and resources, can put their effort into in terms of getting someone to watch their content.
There are three principals that we stress in regards to thumbnails and titles. And they are:
1 - They should accurately describe your content. That doesn’t necessarily mean that it has to have a title that literally spells out exactly what happens in it – but – it shouldn’t be misleading.
2 - The thumbnail and title should excite the viewer. It should get them interested in watching your content. It should be appealing and it should be eye-catching. Those two are similar – but they are also different. What catches the eye versus what gets someone excited about what’s in the video can be two very different things.
3 - The third thing is the programming of the channel. In the sense of, are you laying the groundwork with your uploads, with your best practices, to have a viewer be excited about your next video that is coming out. That takes into account things like, ‘next time on’ trailers, and in the end card of your video telling people that you’re going to be uploading a new video and get them excited about it. The viewers are only going to be as excited about your content as you are. So, making sure you are communicating your schedule effectively. Making sure you have the right information in your description. Also, making sure you’re active on social media – and telling people on those outlets where they can watch your videos.

What are some of the other basic programming strategies that you find creators may not be aware of to nurture their channel?
Certain basics are – regular and consistent uploads. It’s not only good for the YouTube algorithm; it’s good for your audience, which wants a regular amount of fresh content. It is similar to a blog - if you don’t put anything up for a while, people are going to forget about you.
If you go to a blog and you see they haven’t posted anything in a month, two months, you have no reason to come back on a regular basis to see if there’s anything new, or to get their latest updates.
We’ve also had a tremendous amount of success in paid media – advertising – as a programming strategy. We’ve generated probably around 15-20 million views and half a million subscribers from our paid media. That’s been extremely powerful.
Are you talking about advertising solely on other YouTube channels or advertising elsewhere?
Solely on other YouTube channels. We’ll use 100% TrueView in display or In-Search.
What about a situation where you don’t have something new to put up on your channel for a long time? What do you do to keep people psyched and interested and coming back even though you don’t have exactly what they want – when they want it?
In regards to how do you keep the audience entertained when you don’t have the primary content … here’s an example: On Cartoon Hangover we introduced, very early on, the show Hungover With Cade, which is basically the human face to our Cartoon Hangover channel. That allows us to make content much quicker than how long it takes to make an animated video, which takes anywhere from 9 - 18 months to make a single animated short or episode. So, Hungover with Cade kind of functions as a bit of a blog for the channel. So Cade gives updates on where we are on production and new products that are coming out and that sort of thing.
We also have our shorts program, Too Cool Cartoons, which are a series of short animated films. Those are all really really popular. This is the programming effort that created Bee & PuppyCat, which is now being produced as a new series.
It’s kind of a combination of ingenuity and finding other content that will still be very appealing to the audience that is similar in tone and style.
How do you support the channel creators in the Channel Frederator Network community – not just with their deal – but with promotion and support of their content?
The goal for Channel Frederator Network is to be cartoon central on the internet. So, it’s really the best of both worlds – Channel Frederator needs cartoons to be cartoon central on the internet and our network partners need audience for their content. So, by sharing their content with the audience on Channel Frederator, we’re exposing the Channel Frederator audience to these awesome creators and their channels as well as having programming for Channel Frederator.
Additionally, every week we showcase our creators within our weekly shows “ToonsDay!”, which features creator content every Tuesday, and “Saturday Morning Cartoons”, which debuts a group of new cartoons from our creators every Saturday morning. Both of these programming outlets are designed to spotlight videos from the Channel Frederator Network of animators and entertainers.
How do you reach viewers that may be watching content similar to Cartoon Hangover or Channel Frederator content elsewhere?
Remarketing, which is advertising to people who have already viewed or subscribed to one of our YouTube channels. We do a tremendous amount of remarketing for Cartoon Hangover; we don’t do as much for Channel Frederator. For Cartoon Hangover, remarketing is one of our biggest drivers for the paid-media campaign.
Check out the first and second parts of our interview with Matt, also check out Matt’s column in Tubfilter.  
- Gwen

frederatortimes:

In programming your YouTube channel, what does it take to attract viewers to your YouTube channel and keep them coming back? Programming strategies is the focus of part three of our discussion with Matt Gielen, Director of Programming and Audience Development for Cartoon Hangover (1.3 million subscribers, 100+ million views) and Channel Frederator Network (400+ partner channels, 7.5+ million subscribers, and 1 billion+ views). 

FT: What programming strategies really work in getting viewers to watch content on a YouTube channel?

Matt: I would say there are three really important factors in getting people to watch your videos on YouTube, which is obviously an important component in programming.

First and foremost is absolutely the ‘thumbnail’. I like to say that your thumbnail is the equivalent to when a movie studio releases its movie. In order to drive people into the theater – what a movie studio does is buy billboards, they buy ads all over YouTube and the internet, they do these crazy interactive display things, they buy billboards on the side of buses, they run trailers before other movies, they get their stars to appear on late night [and other] talk shows and do interviews with bloggers, and buy paid advertorials, buy print ads in magazines, I could keep going, right? YouTubers have their thumbnails and their titles. That is the entirety of what gets put in front of most of their potential viewers.

(Editor’s Note: If you don’t create your own thumbnail, YouTube generates it for you – and it may not best represent your content.)

But, for the most part the thumbnail is going to be the thing that is the ultimate deciding factor in whether someone chooses to click on your video or not.

Those are hands-down the most important things - the thumbnail and the title - that the YouTuber, with limited time and resources, can put their effort into in terms of getting someone to watch their content.

There are three principals that we stress in regards to thumbnails and titles. And they are:

1 - They should accurately describe your content. That doesn’t necessarily mean that it has to have a title that literally spells out exactly what happens in it – but – it shouldn’t be misleading.

2 - The thumbnail and title should excite the viewer. It should get them interested in watching your content. It should be appealing and it should be eye-catching. Those two are similar – but they are also different. What catches the eye versus what gets someone excited about what’s in the video can be two very different things.

3 - The third thing is the programming of the channel. In the sense of, are you laying the groundwork with your uploads, with your best practices, to have a viewer be excited about your next video that is coming out. That takes into account things like, ‘next time on’ trailers, and in the end card of your video telling people that you’re going to be uploading a new video and get them excited about it. The viewers are only going to be as excited about your content as you are. So, making sure you are communicating your schedule effectively. Making sure you have the right information in your description. Also, making sure you’re active on social media – and telling people on those outlets where they can watch your videos.

What are some of the other basic programming strategies that you find creators may not be aware of to nurture their channel?

Certain basics are – regular and consistent uploads. It’s not only good for the YouTube algorithm; it’s good for your audience, which wants a regular amount of fresh content. It is similar to a blog - if you don’t put anything up for a while, people are going to forget about you.

If you go to a blog and you see they haven’t posted anything in a month, two months, you have no reason to come back on a regular basis to see if there’s anything new, or to get their latest updates.

We’ve also had a tremendous amount of success in paid media – advertising – as a programming strategy. We’ve generated probably around 15-20 million views and half a million subscribers from our paid media. That’s been extremely powerful.

Are you talking about advertising solely on other YouTube channels or advertising elsewhere?

Solely on other YouTube channels. We’ll use 100% TrueView in display or In-Search.

What about a situation where you don’t have something new to put up on your channel for a long time? What do you do to keep people psyched and interested and coming back even though you don’t have exactly what they want – when they want it?

In regards to how do you keep the audience entertained when you don’t have the primary content … here’s an example: On Cartoon Hangover we introduced, very early on, the show Hungover With Cade, which is basically the human face to our Cartoon Hangover channel. That allows us to make content much quicker than how long it takes to make an animated video, which takes anywhere from 9 - 18 months to make a single animated short or episode. So, Hungover with Cade kind of functions as a bit of a blog for the channel. So Cade gives updates on where we are on production and new products that are coming out and that sort of thing.

We also have our shorts program, Too Cool Cartoons, which are a series of short animated films. Those are all really really popular. This is the programming effort that created Bee & PuppyCat, which is now being produced as a new series.

It’s kind of a combination of ingenuity and finding other content that will still be very appealing to the audience that is similar in tone and style.

How do you support the channel creators in the Channel Frederator Network community – not just with their deal – but with promotion and support of their content?

The goal for Channel Frederator Network is to be cartoon central on the internet. So, it’s really the best of both worlds – Channel Frederator needs cartoons to be cartoon central on the internet and our network partners need audience for their content. So, by sharing their content with the audience on Channel Frederator, we’re exposing the Channel Frederator audience to these awesome creators and their channels as well as having programming for Channel Frederator.

Additionally, every week we showcase our creators within our weekly shows “ToonsDay!”, which features creator content every Tuesday, and “Saturday Morning Cartoons”, which debuts a group of new cartoons from our creators every Saturday morning. Both of these programming outlets are designed to spotlight videos from the Channel Frederator Network of animators and entertainers.

How do you reach viewers that may be watching content similar to Cartoon Hangover or Channel Frederator content elsewhere?

Remarketing, which is advertising to people who have already viewed or subscribed to one of our YouTube channels. We do a tremendous amount of remarketing for Cartoon Hangover; we don’t do as much for Channel Frederator. For Cartoon Hangover, remarketing is one of our biggest drivers for the paid-media campaign.

Check out the first and second parts of our interview with Matt, also check out Matt’s column in Tubfilter.  

- Gwen

In programming your YouTube channel, what does it take to attract viewers to your YouTube channel and keep them coming back? Programming strategies is the focus of part three of our discussion with Matt Gielen, Director of Programming and Audience Development for Cartoon Hangover (1.3 million subscribers, 100+ million views) and Channel Frederator Network (400+ partner channels, 7.5+ million subscribers, and 1 billion+ views).  FT: What programming strategies really work in getting viewers to watch content on a YouTube channel? Matt: I would say there are three really important factors in getting people to watch your videos on YouTube, which is obviously an important component in programming. First and foremost is absolutely the ‘thumbnail’. I like to say that your thumbnail is the equivalent to when a movie studio releases its movie. In order to drive people into the theater – what a movie studio does is buy billboards, they buy ads all over YouTube and the internet, they do these crazy interactive display things, they buy billboards on the side of buses, they run trailers before other movies, they get their stars to appear on late night [and other] talk shows and do interviews with bloggers, and buy paid advertorials, buy print ads in magazines, I could keep going, right? YouTubers have their thumbnails and their titles. That is the entirety of what gets put in front of most of their potential viewers. (Editor’s Note: If you don’t create your own thumbnail, YouTube generates it for you – and it may not best represent your content.) But, for the most part the thumbnail is going to be the thing that is the ultimate deciding factor in whether someone chooses to click on your video or not. Those are hands-down the most important things - the thumbnail and the title - that the YouTuber, with limited time and resources, can put their effort into in terms of getting someone to watch their content. There are three principals that we stress in regards to thumbnails and titles. And they are: 1 - They should accurately describe your content. That doesn’t necessarily mean that it has to have a title that literally spells out exactly what happens in it – but – it shouldn’t be misleading. 2 - The thumbnail and title should excite the viewer. It should get them interested in watching your content. It should be appealing and it should be eye-catching. Those two are similar – but they are also different. What catches the eye versus what gets someone excited about what’s in the video can be two very different things. 3 - The third thing is the programming of the channel. In the sense of, are you laying the groundwork with your uploads, with your best practices, to have a viewer be excited about your next video that is coming out. That takes into account things like, ‘next time on’ trailers, and in the end card of your video telling people that you’re going to be uploading a new video and get them excited about it. The viewers are only going to be as excited about your content as you are. So, making sure you are communicating your schedule effectively. Making sure you have the right information in your description. Also, making sure you’re active on social media – and telling people on those outlets where they can watch your videos. What are some of the other basic programming strategies that you find creators may not be aware of to nurture their channel? Certain basics are – regular and consistent uploads. It’s not only good for the YouTube algorithm; it’s good for your audience, which wants a regular amount of fresh content. It is similar to a blog - if you don’t put anything up for a while, people are going to forget about you. If you go to a blog and you see they haven’t posted anything in a month, two months, you have no reason to come back on a regular basis to see if there’s anything new, or to get their latest updates. We’ve also had a tremendous amount of success in paid media – advertising – as a programming strategy. We’ve generated probably around 15-20 million views and half a million subscribers from our paid media. That’s been extremely powerful. Are you talking about advertising solely on other YouTube channels or advertising elsewhere? Solely on other YouTube channels. We’ll use 100% TrueView in display or In-Search. What about a situation where you don’t have something new to put up on your channel for a long time? What do you do to keep people psyched and interested and coming back even though you don’t have exactly what they want – when they want it? In regards to how do you keep the audience entertained when you don’t have the primary content … here’s an example: On Cartoon Hangover we introduced, very early on, the show Hungover With Cade, which is basically the human face to our Cartoon Hangover channel. That allows us to make content much quicker than how long it takes to make an animated video, which takes anywhere from 9 - 18 months to make a single animated short or episode. So, Hungover with Cade kind of functions as a bit of a blog for the channel. So Cade gives updates on where we are on production and new products that are coming out and that sort of thing. We also have our shorts program, Too Cool Cartoons, which are a series of short animated films. Those are all really really popular. This is the programming effort that created Bee & PuppyCat, which is now being produced as a new series. It’s kind of a combination of ingenuity and finding other content that will still be very appealing to the audience that is similar in tone and style. How do you support the channel creators in the Channel Frederator Network community – not just with their deal – but with promotion and support of their content? The goal for Channel Frederator Network is to be cartoon central on the internet. So, it’s really the best of both worlds – Channel Frederator needs cartoons to be cartoon central on the internet and our network partners need audience for their content. So, by sharing their content with the audience on Channel Frederator, we’re exposing the Channel Frederator audience to these awesome creators and their channels as well as having programming for Channel Frederator. Additionally, every week we showcase our creators within our weekly shows “ToonsDay!”, which features creator content every Tuesday, and “Saturday Morning Cartoons”, which debuts a group of new cartoons from our creators every Saturday morning. Both of these programming outlets are designed to spotlight videos from the Channel Frederator Network of animators and entertainers. How do you reach viewers that may be watching content similar to Cartoon Hangover or Channel Frederator content elsewhere? Remarketing, which is advertising to people who have already viewed or subscribed to one of our YouTube channels. We do a tremendous amount of remarketing for Cartoon Hangover; we don’t do as much for Channel Frederator. For Cartoon Hangover, remarketing is one of our biggest drivers for the paid-media campaign. Check out the first and second parts of our interview with Matt, also check out Matt’s column in Tubfilter.   - Gwen

June 23, 2014

In programming your YouTube channel, what does it take to attract viewers to your YouTube channel and keep them coming back? Programming strategies is the focus of part three of our discussion with Matt Gielen, Director of Programming and Audience Development for Cartoon Hangover (1.3 million subscribers, 100+ million views) and Channel Frederator Network (400+ partner channels, 7.5+ million subscribers, and 1 billion+ views). 
FT: What programming strategies really work in getting viewers to watch content on a YouTube channel?
Matt: I would say there are three really important factors in getting people to watch your videos on YouTube, which is obviously an important component in programming.
First and foremost is absolutely the ‘thumbnail’. I like to say that your thumbnail is the equivalent to when a movie studio releases its movie. In order to drive people into the theater – what a movie studio does is buy billboards, they buy ads all over YouTube and the internet, they do these crazy interactive display things, they buy billboards on the side of buses, they run trailers before other movies, they get their stars to appear on late night [and other] talk shows and do interviews with bloggers, and buy paid advertorials, buy print ads in magazines, I could keep going, right? YouTubers have their thumbnails and their titles. That is the entirety of what gets put in front of most of their potential viewers.
(Editor’s Note: If you don’t create your own thumbnail, YouTube generates it for you – and it may not best represent your content.)
But, for the most part the thumbnail is going to be the thing that is the ultimate deciding factor in whether someone chooses to click on your video or not.
Those are hands-down the most important things - the thumbnail and the title - that the YouTuber, with limited time and resources, can put their effort into in terms of getting someone to watch their content.
There are three principals that we stress in regards to thumbnails and titles. And they are:
1 - They should accurately describe your content. That doesn’t necessarily mean that it has to have a title that literally spells out exactly what happens in it – but – it shouldn’t be misleading.
2 - The thumbnail and title should excite the viewer. It should get them interested in watching your content. It should be appealing and it should be eye-catching. Those two are similar – but they are also different. What catches the eye versus what gets someone excited about what’s in the video can be two very different things.
3 - The third thing is the programming of the channel. In the sense of, are you laying the groundwork with your uploads, with your best practices, to have a viewer be excited about your next video that is coming out. That takes into account things like, ‘next time on’ trailers, and in the end card of your video telling people that you’re going to be uploading a new video and get them excited about it. The viewers are only going to be as excited about your content as you are. So, making sure you are communicating your schedule effectively. Making sure you have the right information in your description. Also, making sure you’re active on social media – and telling people on those outlets where they can watch your videos.

What are some of the other basic programming strategies that you find creators may not be aware of to nurture their channel?
Certain basics are – regular and consistent uploads. It’s not only good for the YouTube algorithm; it’s good for your audience, which wants a regular amount of fresh content. It is similar to a blog - if you don’t put anything up for a while, people are going to forget about you.
If you go to a blog and you see they haven’t posted anything in a month, two months, you have no reason to come back on a regular basis to see if there’s anything new, or to get their latest updates.
We’ve also had a tremendous amount of success in paid media – advertising – as a programming strategy. We’ve generated probably around 15-20 million views and half a million subscribers from our paid media. That’s been extremely powerful.
Are you talking about advertising solely on other YouTube channels or advertising elsewhere?
Solely on other YouTube channels. We’ll use 100% TrueView in display or In-Search.
What about a situation where you don’t have something new to put up on your channel for a long time? What do you do to keep people psyched and interested and coming back even though you don’t have exactly what they want – when they want it?
In regards to how do you keep the audience entertained when you don’t have the primary content … here’s an example: On Cartoon Hangover we introduced, very early on, the show Hungover With Cade, which is basically the human face to our Cartoon Hangover channel. That allows us to make content much quicker than how long it takes to make an animated video, which takes anywhere from 9 - 18 months to make a single animated short or episode. So, Hungover with Cade kind of functions as a bit of a blog for the channel. So Cade gives updates on where we are on production and new products that are coming out and that sort of thing.
We also have our shorts program, Too Cool Cartoons, which are a series of short animated films. Those are all really really popular. This is the programming effort that created Bee & PuppyCat, which is now being produced as a new series.
It’s kind of a combination of ingenuity and finding other content that will still be very appealing to the audience that is similar in tone and style.
How do you support the channel creators in the Channel Frederator Network community – not just with their deal – but with promotion and support of their content?
The goal for Channel Frederator Network is to be cartoon central on the internet. So, it’s really the best of both worlds – Channel Frederator needs cartoons to be cartoon central on the internet and our network partners need audience for their content. So, by sharing their content with the audience on Channel Frederator, we’re exposing the Channel Frederator audience to these awesome creators and their channels as well as having programming for Channel Frederator.
Additionally, every week we showcase our creators within our weekly shows “ToonsDay!”, which features creator content every Tuesday, and “Saturday Morning Cartoons”, which debuts a group of new cartoons from our creators every Saturday morning. Both of these programming outlets are designed to spotlight videos from the Channel Frederator Network of animators and entertainers.
How do you reach viewers that may be watching content similar to Cartoon Hangover or Channel Frederator content elsewhere?
Remarketing, which is advertising to people who have already viewed or subscribed to one of our YouTube channels. We do a tremendous amount of remarketing for Cartoon Hangover; we don’t do as much for Channel Frederator. For Cartoon Hangover, remarketing is one of our biggest drivers for the paid-media campaign.
Check out the first and second parts of our interview with Matt, also check out Matt’s column in Tubfilter.  
- Gwen

In programming your YouTube channel, what does it take to attract viewers to your YouTube channel and keep them coming back? Programming strategies is the focus of part three of our discussion with Matt Gielen, Director of Programming and Audience Development for Cartoon Hangover (1.3 million subscribers, 100+ million views) and Channel Frederator Network (400+ partner channels, 7.5+ million subscribers, and 1 billion+ views). 

FT: What programming strategies really work in getting viewers to watch content on a YouTube channel?

Matt: I would say there are three really important factors in getting people to watch your videos on YouTube, which is obviously an important component in programming.

First and foremost is absolutely the ‘thumbnail’. I like to say that your thumbnail is the equivalent to when a movie studio releases its movie. In order to drive people into the theater – what a movie studio does is buy billboards, they buy ads all over YouTube and the internet, they do these crazy interactive display things, they buy billboards on the side of buses, they run trailers before other movies, they get their stars to appear on late night [and other] talk shows and do interviews with bloggers, and buy paid advertorials, buy print ads in magazines, I could keep going, right? YouTubers have their thumbnails and their titles. That is the entirety of what gets put in front of most of their potential viewers.

(Editor’s Note: If you don’t create your own thumbnail, YouTube generates it for you – and it may not best represent your content.)

But, for the most part the thumbnail is going to be the thing that is the ultimate deciding factor in whether someone chooses to click on your video or not.

Those are hands-down the most important things - the thumbnail and the title - that the YouTuber, with limited time and resources, can put their effort into in terms of getting someone to watch their content.

There are three principals that we stress in regards to thumbnails and titles. And they are:

1 - They should accurately describe your content. That doesn’t necessarily mean that it has to have a title that literally spells out exactly what happens in it – but – it shouldn’t be misleading.

2 - The thumbnail and title should excite the viewer. It should get them interested in watching your content. It should be appealing and it should be eye-catching. Those two are similar – but they are also different. What catches the eye versus what gets someone excited about what’s in the video can be two very different things.

3 - The third thing is the programming of the channel. In the sense of, are you laying the groundwork with your uploads, with your best practices, to have a viewer be excited about your next video that is coming out. That takes into account things like, ‘next time on’ trailers, and in the end card of your video telling people that you’re going to be uploading a new video and get them excited about it. The viewers are only going to be as excited about your content as you are. So, making sure you are communicating your schedule effectively. Making sure you have the right information in your description. Also, making sure you’re active on social media – and telling people on those outlets where they can watch your videos.

What are some of the other basic programming strategies that you find creators may not be aware of to nurture their channel?

Certain basics are – regular and consistent uploads. It’s not only good for the YouTube algorithm; it’s good for your audience, which wants a regular amount of fresh content. It is similar to a blog - if you don’t put anything up for a while, people are going to forget about you.

If you go to a blog and you see they haven’t posted anything in a month, two months, you have no reason to come back on a regular basis to see if there’s anything new, or to get their latest updates.

We’ve also had a tremendous amount of success in paid media – advertising – as a programming strategy. We’ve generated probably around 15-20 million views and half a million subscribers from our paid media. That’s been extremely powerful.

Are you talking about advertising solely on other YouTube channels or advertising elsewhere?

Solely on other YouTube channels. We’ll use 100% TrueView in display or In-Search.

What about a situation where you don’t have something new to put up on your channel for a long time? What do you do to keep people psyched and interested and coming back even though you don’t have exactly what they want – when they want it?

In regards to how do you keep the audience entertained when you don’t have the primary content … here’s an example: On Cartoon Hangover we introduced, very early on, the show Hungover With Cade, which is basically the human face to our Cartoon Hangover channel. That allows us to make content much quicker than how long it takes to make an animated video, which takes anywhere from 9 - 18 months to make a single animated short or episode. So, Hungover with Cade kind of functions as a bit of a blog for the channel. So Cade gives updates on where we are on production and new products that are coming out and that sort of thing.

We also have our shorts program, Too Cool Cartoons, which are a series of short animated films. Those are all really really popular. This is the programming effort that created Bee & PuppyCat, which is now being produced as a new series.

It’s kind of a combination of ingenuity and finding other content that will still be very appealing to the audience that is similar in tone and style.

How do you support the channel creators in the Channel Frederator Network community – not just with their deal – but with promotion and support of their content?

The goal for Channel Frederator Network is to be cartoon central on the internet. So, it’s really the best of both worlds – Channel Frederator needs cartoons to be cartoon central on the internet and our network partners need audience for their content. So, by sharing their content with the audience on Channel Frederator, we’re exposing the Channel Frederator audience to these awesome creators and their channels as well as having programming for Channel Frederator.

Additionally, every week we showcase our creators within our weekly shows “ToonsDay!”, which features creator content every Tuesday, and “Saturday Morning Cartoons”, which debuts a group of new cartoons from our creators every Saturday morning. Both of these programming outlets are designed to spotlight videos from the Channel Frederator Network of animators and entertainers.

How do you reach viewers that may be watching content similar to Cartoon Hangover or Channel Frederator content elsewhere?

Remarketing, which is advertising to people who have already viewed or subscribed to one of our YouTube channels. We do a tremendous amount of remarketing for Cartoon Hangover; we don’t do as much for Channel Frederator. For Cartoon Hangover, remarketing is one of our biggest drivers for the paid-media campaign.

Check out the first and second parts of our interview with Matt, also check out Matt’s column in Tubfilter.  

- Gwen

Fred Seibert, Founder & Executive Producer of Frederator Studios, will serve as a keynote speaker at the fifth annual VidCon, a conference for and about the online video entertainment industry that will be held June 26-28, 2014 at the Anaheim Convention Center. Fred’s speech, titled The Year We Grew Up, will look at the few years of ‘happy accidents’ in the online video industry and where we are headed now as the happenstance era comes to close. Other members of the Frederator team, including Frederator Networks’ Matt Gielen, Director of Programming and Audience Development, and Nate Olson, Director of Marketing, Licensing, and Publicity, will also participate in a range of industry panels and community panels (see below), so, if you are there please stop by and say hi. Thursday, June 26, 2014: Keynote: The Year We Grew Up (approximately 10a) Fred Seibert, Founder & Executive Producer of Frederator Studios “Just Ask: Letting Your Audience Pay”    (11:15am - Noon) Drew Baldwin, Founder of Tubefilter and the Streamy Awards (moderator) Panel: Marc Hofstatter, Head of Film at Indiegogo; Jack Conte, Founder of Patreon; Hannah Hart; Nate Olson, Director of Marketing, Licensing, and Publicity for Frederator Networks; Sheri Bryant, Partner at Geek and Sundry; Jehan Ratnatunga, Product Manager, YouTube “Launching a Channel in 2014”    (2pm - 2:45pm) Ze Frank, EVP of Video at BuzzFeed (moderator) Panel: Matt Gielen, Director of Programming & Audience Development at Frederator Networks; Karem Mohamed, KSic; Jim Louderback, GM Discovery Digital Networks; Jen Olivar, Head of Network at Seventeen; Kelly Day, Chief Digital Officer for AwesomenessTV; Georgia Koch, Channel Manager at SoulPancake Friday, June 27, 2014: “Viewers Like You: Crowdfunding in 2014"    (9:30am - 10:30am) Hank Green (moderator) Panel: Jack Conte, Co-Founder of Patreon; Hannah Hart; Destin Sandlin, Smarter Ever Day; Nate Olson, Director of Marketing, Licensing, and Publicity for Frederator Networks “The Whole Pie: Revenue Beyond Advertising”    (11am - Noon) Jocelyn Johnson, Founder of VideoInk (moderator) Panel: Olga Kay; Nate Olson, Director of Marketing, Licensing, and Publicity for Frederator Networks; Sarah Penna, Big Frame; Burnie Burns, Rooster Teeth; Beth Greve, CRO at AwesomenessTV; Sam Toles, VP of Content Acquisitions and Business Development at Vimeo Saturday, June 28, 2014: “Online vs TV”    (12:30pm - 1:30pm) Chris Hardwick (moderator) Panel: Lee Newton, SourceFed; Lucas Cruikshank; Ross Everett; Matt Gielen, Director of Programming & Audience Development at Frederator Networks; Harley Morenstein, Epic Meal Time VidCon was founded by brothers Hank and John Green (John is the author of The Fault In Our Stars, and other YA books), who are well known for their The Vlogbrothers and Crash Course YouTube channels, VidCon 2014 expects to 18,000+ content creators, industry executives and fans to walk through the doors this year. - Gwen

June 22, 2014

Fred Seibert, Founder & Executive Producer of Frederator Studios, will serve as a keynote speaker at the fifth annual VidCon, a conference for and about the online video entertainment industry that will be held June 26-28, 2014 at the Anaheim Convention Center. Fred’s speech, titled The Year We Grew Up, will look at the few years of ‘happy accidents’ in the online video industry and where we are headed now as the happenstance era comes to close.
Other members of the Frederator team, including Frederator Networks’ Matt Gielen, Director of Programming and Audience Development, and Nate Olson, Director of Marketing, Licensing, and Publicity, will also participate in a range of industry panels and community panels (see below), so, if you are there please stop by and say hi.


Thursday, June 26, 2014:
Keynote: The Year We Grew Up (approximately 10a)
Fred Seibert, Founder & Executive Producer of Frederator Studios
“Just Ask: Letting Your Audience Pay”    (11:15am - Noon)
Drew Baldwin, Founder of Tubefilter and the Streamy Awards (moderator)
Panel: Marc Hofstatter, Head of Film at Indiegogo; Jack Conte, Founder of Patreon; Hannah Hart; Nate Olson, Director of Marketing, Licensing, and Publicity for Frederator Networks; Sheri Bryant, Partner at Geek and Sundry; Jehan Ratnatunga, Product Manager, YouTube
“Launching a Channel in 2014”    (2pm - 2:45pm)
Ze Frank, EVP of Video at BuzzFeed (moderator)
Panel: Matt Gielen, Director of Programming & Audience Development at Frederator Networks; Karem Mohamed, KSic; Jim Louderback, GM Discovery Digital Networks; Jen Olivar, Head of Network at Seventeen; Kelly Day, Chief Digital Officer for AwesomenessTV; Georgia Koch, Channel Manager at SoulPancake
Friday, June 27, 2014:
“Viewers Like You: Crowdfunding in 2014"    (9:30am - 10:30am)
Hank Green (moderator)
Panel: Jack Conte, Co-Founder of Patreon; Hannah Hart; Destin Sandlin, Smarter Ever Day; Nate Olson, Director of Marketing, Licensing, and Publicity for Frederator Networks
“The Whole Pie: Revenue Beyond Advertising”    (11am - Noon)
Jocelyn Johnson, Founder of VideoInk (moderator)
Panel: Olga Kay; Nate Olson, Director of Marketing, Licensing, and Publicity for Frederator Networks; Sarah Penna, Big Frame; Burnie Burns, Rooster Teeth; Beth Greve, CRO at AwesomenessTV; Sam Toles, VP of Content Acquisitions and Business Development at Vimeo
Saturday, June 28, 2014:
“Online vs TV”    (12:30pm - 1:30pm)
Chris Hardwick (moderator)
Panel: Lee Newton, SourceFed; Lucas Cruikshank; Ross Everett; Matt Gielen, Director of Programming & Audience Development at Frederator Networks; Harley Morenstein, Epic Meal Time
VidCon was founded by brothers Hank and John Green (John is the author of The Fault In Our Stars, and other YA books), who are well known for their The Vlogbrothers and Crash Course YouTube channels, VidCon 2014 expects to 18,000+ content creators, industry executives and fans to walk through the doors this year.
- Gwen

Fred Seibert, Founder & Executive Producer of Frederator Studios, will serve as a keynote speaker at the fifth annual VidCon, a conference for and about the online video entertainment industry that will be held June 26-28, 2014 at the Anaheim Convention Center. Fred’s speech, titled The Year We Grew Up, will look at the few years of ‘happy accidents’ in the online video industry and where we are headed now as the happenstance era comes to close.

Other members of the Frederator team, including Frederator Networks’ Matt GielenDirector of Programming and Audience Development, and Nate Olson, Director of Marketing, Licensing, and Publicity, will also participate in a range of industry panels and community panels (see below), so, if you are there please stop by and say hi.

Thursday, June 26, 2014:

Keynote: The Year We Grew Up (approximately 10a)

Fred Seibert, Founder & Executive Producer of Frederator Studios

Just Ask: Letting Your Audience Pay”    (11:15am - Noon)

Drew Baldwin, Founder of Tubefilter and the Streamy Awards (moderator)

Panel: Marc Hofstatter, Head of Film at Indiegogo; Jack Conte, Founder of Patreon; Hannah Hart; Nate Olson, Director of Marketing, Licensing, and Publicity for Frederator Networks; Sheri Bryant, Partner at Geek and Sundry; Jehan Ratnatunga, Product Manager, YouTube

Launching a Channel in 2014”    (2pm - 2:45pm)

Ze Frank, EVP of Video at BuzzFeed (moderator)

Panel: Matt Gielen, Director of Programming & Audience Development at Frederator Networks; Karem Mohamed, KSic; Jim Louderback, GM Discovery Digital Networks; Jen Olivar, Head of Network at Seventeen; Kelly Day, Chief Digital Officer for AwesomenessTV; Georgia Koch, Channel Manager at SoulPancake

Friday, June 27, 2014:

Viewers Like You: Crowdfunding in 2014"    (9:30am - 10:30am)

Hank Green (moderator)

Panel: Jack Conte, Co-Founder of Patreon; Hannah Hart; Destin Sandlin, Smarter Ever Day; Nate Olson, Director of Marketing, Licensing, and Publicity for Frederator Networks

The Whole Pie: Revenue Beyond Advertising”    (11am - Noon)

Jocelyn Johnson, Founder of VideoInk (moderator)

Panel: Olga Kay; Nate Olson, Director of Marketing, Licensing, and Publicity for Frederator Networks; Sarah Penna, Big Frame; Burnie Burns, Rooster Teeth; Beth Greve, CRO at AwesomenessTV; Sam Toles, VP of Content Acquisitions and Business Development at Vimeo

Saturday, June 28, 2014:

Online vs TV    (12:30pm - 1:30pm)

Chris Hardwick (moderator)

Panel: Lee Newton, SourceFed; Lucas Cruikshank; Ross Everett; Matt Gielen, Director of Programming & Audience Development at Frederator Networks; Harley Morenstein, Epic Meal Time

VidCon was founded by brothers Hank and John Green (John is the author of The Fault In Our Stars, and other YA books), who are well known for their The Vlogbrothers and Crash Course YouTube channels, VidCon 2014 expects to 18,000+ content creators, industry executives and fans to walk through the doors this year.

- Gwen

As if it wasn’t fly enough already - Cartoon Hangover has released the update for its mobile game Fly Catbug Fly! (iOS, Android). The update includes a new level and more characters from the series, among other things. Now you can play as Plum, using her telekinesis to fly super fast, or Emotion Lord to help get more power-ups. Players can also venture into the Dimension Garden, featured in the season 2 finale of Bravest Warriors and play the new special classic mode of the game. Additionally, not only are there a butt-load of new costumes/accessories for Catbug, the update has a redesigned store menu that makes it easier to shop. Developed by Ludoko Studios for Frederator Networks, Fly Catbug Fly!, an infinite, side-scrolling, flier single player game, is based on Cartoon Hangover’s animated series Bravest Warriors created by Pendleton Ward (Adventure Time). - Gwen

June 12, 2014

As if it wasn’t fly enough already - Cartoon Hangover has released the update for its mobile game Fly Catbug Fly! (iOSAndroid).

The update includes a new level and more characters from the series, among other things. Now you can play as Plum, using her telekinesis to fly super fast, or Emotion Lord to help get more power-ups.

Players can also venture into the Dimension Garden, featured in the season 2 finale of Bravest Warriors and play the new special classic mode of the game. Additionally, not only are there a butt-load of new costumes/accessories for Catbug, the update has a redesigned store menu that makes it easier to shop.

Developed by Ludoko Studios for Frederator Networks, Fly Catbug Fly!, an infinite, side-scrolling, flier single player game, is based on Cartoon Hangover’s animated series Bravest Warriors created by Pendleton Ward (Adventure Time).

- Gwen

What does it mean to program a channel or a network (sometimes referred to as a multi-channel network - MCN) on YouTube? Matt Gielen is Director of Programming and Audience Development for Frederator, where he heads up programming for Cartoon Hangover (1.3 million subscribers, 100+ million views) and Channel Frederator Network (300+ partner channels, 7.5+ million subscribers, and 1+ billion views). In part two of my programming discussion, I talk with Matt about what programming is and about viewing patterns. Catch the first part of Matt’s interview here. FT: What does media programming mean in general and specifically for YouTube? Matt: That was actually one of the biggest points of not really contention – but maybe misunderstanding between Fred and me – for I think the first few months – if not many months – after I started working here because, you know in the digital world engineers really commandeered the word programming. I’m talking about  programming in the traditional sense of the word. Programming is essentially the art and science behind getting people to your channel, keeping them on your channel, and then having them come back to your channel. It encompasses the what, when, how and why of where you put your content or how you package your content – what they see when you put it up, where you put it up. The three easiest fields that go into it are what would be called audience development, which is really like a combination of YouTube best practices (such as optimizing the content for the platform), promotion (paid and organic), and then packaging and scheduling. How do you know who you are programming to? It’s kind of twofold – it is probably 80% analytics, 20% anecdotal. So we spend a tremendous amount of time looking at our analytics, looking at our demographics. There are some tools out there – like Tubular, which allow us to look at our audience crossover. Essentially with Tubular you can go in and see what your audience overlap is with other channels. And that gives us some really good information into what our audience likes. There’s also Open Graph with Facebook – that can also show overlap in audience, which is really helpful information to inform programming decisions. Within YouTube analytics we’re able to get very, very granular – seeing who our audience is, anywhere from 13 to 65+ years-old, what country they are in, in the US you can see what state they are in, and then you can also see what kind of content they are responding to, and how they are responding to it. So, we spend countless hours in spreadsheets trying to understand how individual videos perform, and why they perform that way, which gives us a bit of picture to how are channel is performing … and why it is performing in a certain way. So, we’ll get down and look at how many likes per unique an individual video got and why. We’ll look at the individual click through rates on animations as a whole and why. We’ll look at the performance of ‘next time ons,’ which is basically like a trailer for the next episode that goes up, we’ll look at the performance of that, and then say “what impact did this have on the episode that ‘next time on’ was for?” How do you know a trailer/teaser has actually worked? Well, we can look at the video second-to-second in terms of an attention graph. We can look at trailer and go “Ok – people responded to this because they paused it here,” or they went back and watched it again, and look at it that way. So we can say, “this many people completed viewing of the trailer.” Then – this trailer compared to our other trailers had a higher attention rate, or had a higher likes per unique than our other trailers - what can we use from that information to inform future trailers? And, if this trailer gets more likes per uniques – does this indicate that our audience is more excited about the next episode coming out? We just wrote the Ten YouTube Commandments e-book and we’re going to publish that, and we’re showing information that I don’t think anyone else has really ever showed about their channel’s performance and how they look at their channel’s performance and video performance. In fact, I don’t know if many people even look at it the way we do, or dig down in the mines the way we do. Frederator Books will publish the Ten YouTube Commandments will be published by  as an e-book very soon. OK, so let’s back up for a second. You’re talking about a channel and analytics and the things you do for, say, Cartoon Hangover. Does that same set of rules apply to all the channels that go into making up Channel Frederator Network? We have two goals for how we work with the creators in our network - education and promotion. So, our first step is to educate, these are the things that have worked for us and here’s how to think about it - and then if we can, provide any sort of tools that help that process in programming. The next thing is to promote them, the individual channels in the network, which is kind of a different subject altogether. We do that in a variety of ways. Essentially, on the programming side of things, we have a ‘best practice’ document, and we review that twice a month via Google Hangout with any new creators that would like to be walked through it. As far as viewing patterns, do viewers watch 5 min at a time, like an episode of Bravest Warriors, and then once they’ve watched one episode they go and watch all the others – like a binge watch (when that’s a possibility) – or they do really watch one and come back the following week? That’s a hard question to answer. First and foremost, YouTube doesn’t actually give us any insight into session time or entrance and exit pages, which would be really helpful and is kind of a key feature of Google Analytics. A key metric for us is ‘views per unique’ – so, how many videos do they watch per day, and how many videos do they watch per month. Historically, we average about three videos, per unique, per day, and 4.5 videos, per unique, per month. On average they spend about 13.5 minutes, per month, per unique watching Cartoon Hangover content. COMING SOON: Part III – Programming strategies: What works? Check out the first part of the Frederator Times interview with Matt, as well as Matt’s column in Tubfilter.   - Gwen

June 10, 2014

What does it mean to program a channel or a network (sometimes referred to as a multi-channel network - MCN) on YouTube? Matt Gielen is Director of Programming and Audience Development for Frederator, where he heads up programming for Cartoon Hangover (1.3 million subscribers, 100+ million views) and Channel Frederator Network (300+ partner channels, 7.5+ million subscribers, and 1+ billion views). In part two of my programming discussion, I talk with Matt about what programming is and about viewing patterns. Catch the first part of Matt’s interview here.
FT: What does media programming mean in general and specifically for YouTube?
Matt: That was actually one of the biggest points of not really contention – but maybe misunderstanding between Fred and me – for I think the first few months – if not many months – after I started working here because, you know in the digital world engineers really commandeered the word programming. I’m talking about  programming in the traditional sense of the word.
Programming is essentially the art and science behind getting people to your channel, keeping them on your channel, and then having them come back to your channel. It encompasses the what, when, how and why of where you put your content or how you package your content – what they see when you put it up, where you put it up.
The three easiest fields that go into it are what would be called audience development, which is really like a combination of YouTube best practices (such as optimizing the content for the platform), promotion (paid and organic), and then packaging and scheduling.
How do you know who you are programming to?
It’s kind of twofold – it is probably 80% analytics, 20% anecdotal. So we spend a tremendous amount of time looking at our analytics, looking at our demographics. There are some tools out there – like Tubular, which allow us to look at our audience crossover. Essentially with Tubular you can go in and see what your audience overlap is with other channels. And that gives us some really good information into what our audience likes. There’s also Open Graph with Facebook – that can also show overlap in audience, which is really helpful information to inform programming decisions.
Within YouTube analytics we’re able to get very, very granular – seeing who our audience is, anywhere from 13 to 65+ years-old, what country they are in, in the US you can see what state they are in, and then you can also see what kind of content they are responding to, and how they are responding to it. So, we spend countless hours in spreadsheets trying to understand how individual videos perform, and why they perform that way, which gives us a bit of picture to how are channel is performing … and why it is performing in a certain way.
So, we’ll get down and look at how many likes per unique an individual video got and why. We’ll look at the individual click through rates on animations as a whole and why. We’ll look at the performance of ‘next time ons,’ which is basically like a trailer for the next episode that goes up, we’ll look at the performance of that, and then say “what impact did this have on the episode that ‘next time on’ was for?”
How do you know a trailer/teaser has actually worked?
Well, we can look at the video second-to-second in terms of an attention graph. We can look at trailer and go “Ok – people responded to this because they paused it here,” or they went back and watched it again, and look at it that way. So we can say, “this many people completed viewing of the trailer.” Then – this trailer compared to our other trailers had a higher attention rate, or had a higher likes per unique than our other trailers - what can we use from that information to inform future trailers? And, if this trailer gets more likes per uniques – does this indicate that our audience is more excited about the next episode coming out?
We just wrote the Ten YouTube Commandments e-book and we’re going to publish that, and we’re showing information that I don’t think anyone else has really ever showed about their channel’s performance and how they look at their channel’s performance and video performance. In fact, I don’t know if many people even look at it the way we do, or dig down in the mines the way we do. Frederator Books will publish the Ten YouTube Commandments will be published by  as an e-book very soon.
OK, so let’s back up for a second. You’re talking about a channel and analytics and the things you do for, say, Cartoon Hangover. Does that same set of rules apply to all the channels that go into making up Channel Frederator Network?
We have two goals for how we work with the creators in our network - education and promotion.
So, our first step is to educate, these are the things that have worked for us and here’s how to think about it - and then if we can, provide any sort of tools that help that process in programming. 
The next thing is to promote them, the individual channels in the network, which is kind of a different subject altogether. We do that in a variety of ways. Essentially, on the programming side of things, we have a ‘best practice’ document, and we review that twice a month via Google Hangout with any new creators that would like to be walked through it.
As far as viewing patterns, do viewers watch 5 min at a time, like an episode of Bravest Warriors, and then once they’ve watched one episode they go and watch all the others – like a binge watch (when that’s a possibility) – or they do really watch one and come back the following week?
That’s a hard question to answer. First and foremost, YouTube doesn’t actually give us any insight into session time or entrance and exit pages, which would be really helpful and is kind of a key feature of Google Analytics.
A key metric for us is ‘views per unique’ – so, how many videos do they watch per day, and how many videos do they watch per month. Historically, we average about three videos, per unique, per day, and 4.5 videos, per unique, per month. On average they spend about 13.5 minutes, per month, per unique watching Cartoon Hangover content.
COMING SOON: Part III – Programming strategies: What works?
Check out the first part of the Frederator Times interview with Matt, as well as Matt’s column in Tubfilter.  

- Gwen

What does it mean to program a channel or a network (sometimes referred to as a multi-channel network - MCN) on YouTube? Matt Gielen is Director of Programming and Audience Development for Frederator, where he heads up programming for Cartoon Hangover (1.3 million subscribers, 100+ million views) and Channel Frederator Network (300+ partner channels, 7.5+ million subscribers, and 1+ billion views). In part two of my programming discussion, I talk with Matt about what programming is and about viewing patterns. Catch the first part of Matt’s interview here.

FT: What does media programming mean in general and specifically for YouTube?

Matt: That was actually one of the biggest points of not really contention – but maybe misunderstanding between Fred and me – for I think the first few months – if not many months – after I started working here because, you know in the digital world engineers really commandeered the word programming. I’m talking about  programming in the traditional sense of the word.

Programming is essentially the art and science behind getting people to your channel, keeping them on your channel, and then having them come back to your channel. It encompasses the what, when, how and why of where you put your content or how you package your content – what they see when you put it up, where you put it up.

The three easiest fields that go into it are what would be called audience development, which is really like a combination of YouTube best practices (such as optimizing the content for the platform), promotion (paid and organic), and then packaging and scheduling.

How do you know who you are programming to?

It’s kind of twofold – it is probably 80% analytics, 20% anecdotal. So we spend a tremendous amount of time looking at our analytics, looking at our demographics. There are some tools out there – like Tubular, which allow us to look at our audience crossover. Essentially with Tubular you can go in and see what your audience overlap is with other channels. And that gives us some really good information into what our audience likes. There’s also Open Graph with Facebook – that can also show overlap in audience, which is really helpful information to inform programming decisions.

Within YouTube analytics we’re able to get very, very granular – seeing who our audience is, anywhere from 13 to 65+ years-old, what country they are in, in the US you can see what state they are in, and then you can also see what kind of content they are responding to, and how they are responding to it. So, we spend countless hours in spreadsheets trying to understand how individual videos perform, and why they perform that way, which gives us a bit of picture to how are channel is performing … and why it is performing in a certain way.

So, we’ll get down and look at how many likes per unique an individual video got and why. We’ll look at the individual click through rates on animations as a whole and why. We’ll look at the performance of ‘next time ons,’ which is basically like a trailer for the next episode that goes up, we’ll look at the performance of that, and then say “what impact did this have on the episode that ‘next time on’ was for?”

How do you know a trailer/teaser has actually worked?

Well, we can look at the video second-to-second in terms of an attention graph. We can look at trailer and go “Ok – people responded to this because they paused it here,” or they went back and watched it again, and look at it that way. So we can say, “this many people completed viewing of the trailer.” Then – this trailer compared to our other trailers had a higher attention rate, or had a higher likes per unique than our other trailers - what can we use from that information to inform future trailers? And, if this trailer gets more likes per uniques – does this indicate that our audience is more excited about the next episode coming out?

We just wrote the Ten YouTube Commandments e-book and we’re going to publish that, and we’re showing information that I don’t think anyone else has really ever showed about their channel’s performance and how they look at their channel’s performance and video performance. In fact, I don’t know if many people even look at it the way we do, or dig down in the mines the way we do. Frederator Books will publish the Ten YouTube Commandments will be published by  as an e-book very soon.

OK, so let’s back up for a second. You’re talking about a channel and analytics and the things you do for, say, Cartoon Hangover. Does that same set of rules apply to all the channels that go into making up Channel Frederator Network?

We have two goals for how we work with the creators in our network - education and promotion.

So, our first step is to educate, these are the things that have worked for us and here’s how to think about it - and then if we can, provide any sort of tools that help that process in programming.

The next thing is to promote them, the individual channels in the network, which is kind of a different subject altogether. We do that in a variety of ways. Essentially, on the programming side of things, we have a ‘best practice’ document, and we review that twice a month via Google Hangout with any new creators that would like to be walked through it.

As far as viewing patterns, do viewers watch 5 min at a time, like an episode of Bravest Warriors, and then once they’ve watched one episode they go and watch all the others – like a binge watch (when that’s a possibility) – or they do really watch one and come back the following week?

That’s a hard question to answer. First and foremost, YouTube doesn’t actually give us any insight into session time or entrance and exit pages, which would be really helpful and is kind of a key feature of Google Analytics.

A key metric for us is ‘views per unique’ – so, how many videos do they watch per day, and how many videos do they watch per month. Historically, we average about three videos, per unique, per day, and 4.5 videos, per unique, per month. On average they spend about 13.5 minutes, per month, per unique watching Cartoon Hangover content.

COMING SOON: Part III – Programming strategies: What works?

Check out the first part of the Frederator Times interview with Matt, as well as Matt’s column in Tubfilter.  

- Gwen